PDA

View Full Version : experiance helps



grumpyvette
08-17-2008, 05:11 PM
have a buddy that stopped by to have me look at a problem with his honda, now I generally won,t poke a honda with a sharp stick, but hes a nice guy and needs help, we traced the problem to a partly clogged fuel filter,(orriginal and hes got 100K on the car) and I suppose some 120 pound double jointed guy from japan was the morron who decided to locate the fuel filter, up above the steering/suspension and down behind the engine and under the master cylinder where its bolted into a bracket and all the hot engine parts and you can barely see it without a shop light and requires a crowsfoot wrench and a 2 ft extention to reach it from below the car, naturally theres special bolt thats cross drilled and hollow that fastens the filter to the fuel railshttp://www.pegasusautoracing.com/Images/L/3242.JPG and it requires two copper o-rings and standing on your head to get access.....and naturaly the bolt faLLS , but fails to fall thru to the floor and its wedged where it can,t be seen, well after looking for the little S.O.B. for 15 minutes with magnets and mirrors and several shop lights its no place to be found and we can,t continue without it, my friend says well just order a new one in the morning.....B.S. that suckers there I just can,t see it, so I do what any \experianced mechanic would do, I crank both air compressors up to max pressure and get the air hose with a long spray nozzle,and put on my safety goggles and start shooting high pressure air into every area on the frame and suspension....well in no time Ive got a very dry, clean engine compartment and the bolt that was missing comes flying out of some crevis it was hiddening in onto the shop floor and in about 10 more minutes work the cars up and running.....see! thats were experiance and persistance pays, you know that theres several ways to find drop bolts

grumpyvette
08-25-2008, 01:21 PM
I know! youve never done something and your afraid youll mess it up,
EXAMPLE
the first time I looked over a TPI injection system I was very reluctant to start taking things apart, so as a hedge I took a dozen close up digital photos and labled every connection with masking tape and a majic marker sharpie pen, I had no idea how the injector connectors were released and didn,t realize there was a spring retainer untill Id got four removed, but after about the first dozen, I didn,t even bother looking any longer since things were so familiar.
EXAMPLE
the wifes MERCURY had the power seat control switch in the door go bad, I bought a new one,but I was very reluctant to disassemble the door panel, as I was sure ID screw it up!, but some careful inspection revealed it could easily be accessed and in 10 minutes I was done doing a job ID been hesitant to start for days.
theres a first time for nearly everything and youll be surprised, in many cases youll find you enjoy knowing how to do things better.....think back to how clumsy and hesitant you probably felt when you started dateing,but learning new skills has its benefits

now I got asked,
"what do you do, who do you call when your about to tackle a job youve never done before?"
now most guys sub out jobs to the dealer or a corvette shop when they get into areas they may not be familiar with,but I do ALL the work on my corvettes for TWO good reasons, first I could NEVER afford the shop rates and I can NEVER trust the quality of work many shops do, now ILL be the VERY FIRST GUY IN LINE to ADMIT Im in WAY over my head at times! but Ive always been able to research the processes, tools, and skills and do the work, or find someone too teach me the skills eventually, youll NEVER learn new stuff if your not willing to tackle new projects and get in way over your current skill level....besides it USUALLY requires buying LOTS OF new tools and meeting new friends so you can,t hardly lose!

IF you take this advice seriously youll save ALOT of time and money,
BUY YOUR CARS FACTORY SERVICE MANUAL.

DO YOURSELF A HUGE FAVOR
buy these books, FIRST it will be the best money you ever spent, read them, and you will be miles ahead of the average guy. youll save thousands of dollars and thousands of hours once youve got a good basic understanding of what your trying to do!

http://www.themotorbookstore.com/resmchstvi.html

how to assemble an engine basics on video


these books


HOW TO BUILD MAX PERFORMANCE CHEVY SMALL BLOCKS ON A BUDGET by DAVID VIZARD
http://www.amazon.com/Build-Performance-Blocks-Budget-Design/dp/1884089348/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1195231793&sr=1-1

JOHN LINGENFELTER on modifying small-block chevy engines

http://www.amazon.com/John-Lingenfelter-Modifying-Chevy-Engines/dp/155788238X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1195231760&sr=1-1


SMOKEY YUNICK,S POWER SECRETS

http://www.amazon.com/Smokey-Yunicks-Power-Secrets-Yunick/dp/0931472067/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1195231724&sr=1-1

How to Rebuild Small-Block Chevy Lt1/Lt4 Engines
http://www.amazon.com/Rebuild-Small-Block-Chevy-Engines-Hp1393/dp/1557883939/ref=pd_sim_b

grumpyvette
08-26-2008, 06:12 AM
we ALL tend to remember better and learn more from our own and others ,SCREW UPS than when things go flawlessly...if your not occasionally screwing something up its obvious your not doing much engine rebuilding or many extensive modifications on a steady basis,

EXPERT= REQUIRES YOU TO BE EXTENSIVELY EXPERIANCED IN A CERTAIN FIELD OF ENDEVOR

EXPERIANCE= VERTUALLY REQUIRES PAST SCREW UPS

Donna_and_John
08-26-2008, 10:41 AM
EXPERT= REQUIRES YOU TO BE EXTENSIVELY EXPERIANCED IN A CERTAIN FIELD OF ENDEVOR

EXPERIANCE= VERTUALLY REQUIRES PAST SCREW UPS

Sounds like good definitions to me Grump.

I must admit to being nervous about working on stuff when I was younger. Because of the cost factor (high school girlfriends can be very expensive), I was "forced" to doing things on my own a lot. I was also lucky that I had a good mechanic in the neighborhood that would give me some pointers every now and then. I found that doing some research and then taking my time, double checking things, worked well. I was sooo relieved when that first engine I built fired up and ran smooth :) :) It lasted for a few years under very severe use (aka my little brother's driving) before it shelled completely.

The second re-build in that truck (took the good parts off the blown motor, plus the good parts from a junkyard shortblock) is still running today, 13 years later. True, the little brother's driving habits have improved greatly since then, but I'm still proud of how I got that together, working correctly, for as little as I did.

grumpyvette
09-04-2008, 11:54 AM
BTW,
its a known fact you need (4) 6 point and (4) 12 point sockets in BOTH 3/8"drive and 1/2" drive in BOTH standard and deep versions for every size of every bolt, both metric and SAE and every nut on any car you own just to BEGIN working on them,and altho wrenches and ratchets are a bit harder to loose youll need a good sekllection of those also, because at least 1/3rd of those sockets/wrenches,etc. will have rolled under the car, under a work bench or will either brake or get misplaced durring EVERY project!
remember EVERY PROJECT TAKES LONGER AND COSTS MORE THAN YOU THINK IT WILL.....GET USED TO THE FACT AND COMPENSATE FOR IT!,EXPECT IT!

once the car runs do an inventory of the tools and buy new ones to replace the ones you throw accross the shop, lost, welded accidently, broke or dropped into non-accessable holes in the car, or lost under the benches and behind machinery in the shop, after awhile you understand the necessity of stopping by SEARs, or MAC ,or SNAPON, regularly, and just figure its a NORMAL part of the procedure, as necessary as band-aids,asprin,a pad and pen and beer ,a few soft cuss words and paper towels are to any car project